Career exploration and job search tips for extraverted personality types

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Posted 22 March 2022 by Vanessa, MBTIonline Contributing Writer
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There’s a lot at stake when you chose a career.

The good news is you can change directions at any time – whether you’re starting fresh as a college grad or you’re shifting careers later in life.

It’s never too late to pick a new path.

The not-so-good news is you might get lost in a maze of career choices if you don’t know where you’re headed. Fortunately, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®) personality assessment is an excellent navigator through MBTIonline Careers. 

Any personality type can excel in any career

None of us have a crystal ball that tells us whether we’ll thrive in a certain career. And it’s unethical for a company to make hiring decisions based on MBTI personality type. So, the goal isn’t necessarily to find a perfect match. Because there’s no such thing. 

And any type can excel in any career.

At some point, we all need to flex our preferences (i.e., do the opposite of what feels natural) to do certain parts of our job well.

We all have unique skills, interests, values, and needs. When you evaluate whether a job is a good fit, consider all the nuances of a particular career path. Take a teacher for example. Think of the amount of noise (and finger paint) a kindergarten teacher must experience each day. Now think of a middle school math teacher. Their day is probably a little quieter (emphasis on the probably). But for the sake of this example, let’s assume most 13-year-olds don’t need as much coddling as their kindergarten counterparts. Both teachers have the same title of teacher, but their jobs look vastly different from one another.

Below area few tips and career ideas for those with extraverted personality types. 

ESTP: The Energetic Problem Solver

ESTPs usually prefer a career that allows them to work with their hands on tasks that require attention-to-detail. Some strengths of this personality type include: an entrepreneurial spirit, crisis management skills, and an ability to sell/promote. But they may spend too much time networking in unproductive ways. Here are some of the most popular occupations/industries for an ESTP:
 
Actor
First responder
Forestry 
Journalist
Mechanical engineer
Military
Pilot
Stockbroker
 
ESTP Career Tip: Try not to overwhelm colleagues or potential employers with too many details.

ESFP: The Enthusiast Improvisor 

ESFPs usually prefer a career in which they can serve others in practical ways. Strengths of this personality type include: enthusiasm, an ability to motivate others, and negotiation skills. But they may not always appear to be task-oriented (especially to people with a preference for Thinking). Here are some of the most popular occupations/industries for an ESFP:
 
Customer service
Event planner
Fashion consultant
First responder
Parks and recreation
Real estate
Teacher
Veterinary technician 
 
ESFP Career Tip: Figure out how your people skills can help improve the bottom line.

ENFP: The Imaginative Motivator 

ENFPs usually prefer a career that involves teaching people how to feel or look better. Many also gravitate toward careers in which they can take care of the environment. Some strengths of this personality type include: openness to new possibilities, high energy, and creativity. But their enthusiasm means they may talk too much during interviews or meetings. Here are some of the most popular occupations/industries for an ENFP:
 
Coach/trainer
Entrepreneur
Forestry 
Lawyer
Marketing
Motivational speaker
Photographer
Psychologist
 
ENFP Career Tip: Be intentional about pausing during interviews or meetings so others can respond.

ENTP: The Enterprising Explorer

ENTPs usually prefer a career that lets them take on new challenges, and they casta wide net when considering different options. Strengths of this personality type include: systems-level problem solving skills, ingenuity, and an entrepreneurial approach. But they may overwhelm colleagues or superiors (especially those who prefer Sensing) with too many possibilities. Here are some of the most popular occupations/industries for an ENTP:
 
Architect
Lawyer
Linguist
Politician
Public speaker
Radio/TV personality
Sales executive
Sports/media executive
 
ENTP Career Tip: Prioritize the possibilities you come up with, then set a “decision deadline.”

ESTJ: The Efficient Organizer

ESTJs usually prefer positions of power where they can make decisions based on facts. Some strengths of this personality type include: decisiveness, an ability to maintain effective procedures, and an analytical mind. But they have a tendency to get overly distressed by unscheduled events. Here are some of the most popular occupations/industries for an ESTJ:
 
Business executive
Chef
Civil engineer
Facilities manager
Financial advisor
Law enforcement
Manufacturing
Military 
 
ESTJ Career Tip: To avoid making hasty decisions, remember that logic is just one part of the equation.

ESFJ: The Supportive Contributor 

ESFJs usually prefer a career that lets them use their attention to detail to care for others. Strengths of this personality type include: an ability to build consensus among a group, decisiveness, and a personable nature. But they may let other people dictate their decisions without realizing it. Here are some of the most popular occupations/industries for an ESFJ:
 
Childcare worker
Cosmetologist 
Human resources
Medical assistant
Nurse
Office manager
Operations manager
Photographer
 
ESFJ Career Tip: Before you make a decision, consider its consequences and alternatives.

ENFJ: The Compassionate Facilitator 

ENFJs usually prefer a career that involves working closely with people. Some strengths of this personality type include: an ability to create harmony on a team, enthusiasm, and organizational skills. But they may have trouble taking advantage of unexpected opportunities. Here are some of the most popular occupations/industries for an ENFJ:
 
College recruiter
Convention organizer
Elementary school teacher
Interior designer
Motivational speaker
Public relations
Sales/marketing
Social worker
 
ENFJ Career Tip: Even if it doesn’t feel like it, there’s usually time to brainstorm before making a decision.

ENTJ: The Decisive Strategist 

ENTJs usually prefer a career where they can be in charge – regardless of what tasks are involved. Strengths of this personality type include: long-range vision, rationality, and an ability to organize systems. But they may appear impersonal or too task-oriented. Here are some of the most popular occupations/industries for an ENTJ: 
 
Anesthesiologist
Business executive
College professor
Criminal justice
Engineer
Marketing executive
Program manager
Regional planner
 
ENTJ Career Tip: Try to establish some personal rapport with colleagues or potential employers.

 

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